WPHS Celebrates Senior Pet Month

With striking green eyes, long whiskers and a soft coat, Nico is obviously a good-looking kitty.  But this handsome feline has been waiting for his forever home for almost a month now.  Honestly, we cannot figure out why.  To be fair, Nico did come to us with a vision impairment (he is essentially blind).  But other than that, he is a normal kitty who wants someone to love him, and to love someone in return.

So why is Nico still here?  Our best guess is that it may have something to do with the age on the kennel card that hangs from his cage.  Since Nico was abandoned at the shelter, we had to estimate his age.  After taking a look, our veterinarians estimated this darling boy to be around 10 years old.  While kittens and young cats are quick to be adopted, often our animals in their senior years end up being in a shelter longer than their younger counterparts – simply for their age.

If you did not already know, November is “Adopt a Senior Pet” month.  If you have never thought about adopting an older pet – now is the time!  Nico is just one of the many animals at the WPHS who are in their “golden years.”

Like Sissy…

                                                       …. or Ram

… and Scamp!

With senior pets, there is no guess work that comes with these animals.  What you see is what you get.  The personality, health issues, quirks,  and behavior of each older animal is well documented and understood.  The truth is senior animals are who they are, and you know what you are walking into when you adopt one.  But they are just as loving and in need of a great home as younger animals. You just have to be willing to open your heart. Visit www.wpahumane.org  to see all of our senior pets waiting for their retirement home!

An Update from Two Unexpected Friends!

Chloe  Rooney

In October 2011, I adopted a 6-year old Mini Rex rabbit named Chloe. Chloe was already litter box trained and free roaming, and essentially the perfect pet for a college student with no space. There was just one problem; While rabbits tend to thrive in pairs, Chloe’s bossy nature kept shelter staff from successfully matching her to anyone else. Just one year later, I was able to find the perfect, but quite unlikely, match for my little furball– a Doberman Pinscher.

I found Rooney (then named Ivy) at the Western PA Humane Society last November at about 8 months old. I’d always adored dobermans, but upon my first interaction with the awkward pup, I knew she had to be mine! Within a week or so, this dog (surrendered for being “untrainable”) had settled into our home perfectly. She was already fantastic with potty and leash manners and had mastered about 10 commands. Most important to me, however, was Rooney’s total lack of reaction to cats, birds or small animals we encountered on walks and pet store trips.

I eventually felt comfortable enough to introduce my girls, first through a gate, then with Rooney on leash.  From the day they were allowed free roam together, Rooney and Chloe were great pals. Although I was surprised at how  quickly Rooney gained Chloe’s trust, I was not at all shocked to see all 6 lbs. of Chloe bossing around her new  friend with grunts and nudges. Luckily for us, Rooney responds well to Chloe’s “herding” and respects that the bunny is boss!!

Never in my wildest dreams did I think I’d have such success introducing a dog to my Chloe, especially so quickly! I certainly don’t believe that there is a more perfect canine match for me and my family. Rooney and I are starting our first round of obedience classes at WPHS in order to earn a therapy dog certification. We hope to not only touch the lives of others through our therapy visits, but also to change negative misconceptions about shelter dogs and the doberman breed as a whole.

Thank you WPHS!

Author: Jamie Rempel

Brand New Program Benefitting W. PA Veterans

Western PA Humane Society Creates new Veteran’s Adoption Program

The Western PA Humane Society (WPHS) is excited to announce the creation of “The Western PA Society Veterans Program” at the Western PA Humane Society’s North Shore and Fallen Timber Shelters.  The program’s goal is to successfully match veterans with adoptable companion pets (dog, cat or rabbit) from the Western PA Humane Society’s North Shore or Elizabeth shelters.  The program provides financial assistance with adoptions, obedience classes and pet care supplies sold at the WPHS shelter retail stores.

  • ADOPTION FEE WAIVED
  • COMPLIMENTARY ONE YEAR WPHS MEMBERSHIP (reduction in vet care      costs)
  • COMPLIMENTARY PERSONALIZED ID TAG
  • $50.00 TO $100.00 VOUCHER FOR WPHS STORE (depending upon type of      pet adopted)
  • COMPLIMENTARY OBEDIENCE TRAINING CLASSES

“We are very excited about this new adoption initiative,” says Executive Director David Janusek.  “We have been building this program for a long time and looking at different organizations that have done this sort of match-making in their cities.  We are looking forward to bringing this special adoption plan to Pittsburgh and its large population of military veterans.”   For any active military personnel or honorably discharged military vet that is willing to adopt please visit our website www.wpahumae.org and click on “programs” to fill out an application and to find out more about adding a companion to the family.

The Western PA Humane Society is one of the oldest Humane Society’s in the United States, serving Pittsburgh for 138 years.  The Western PA Humane Society is an “open door” shelter, meaning that they take all animals into their facility without a waiting list or a required fee (although the shelter does ask for a donation when animals are being released to their care.)  Last year the Western PA Humane Society took in over 13,000 unwanted animals.  For more information about the shelter, its available animals, and on the Veterans Adoption program please visit www.wpahumane.org.